11 Greatest Mike Nichols Moments

Why We Pay Tribute to the Late Director and Comedian

Nichols and Taylor: The late Mike Nichols with Elizabeth Taylor, star of his film “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf.”
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Nichols and Taylor: The late Mike Nichols with Elizabeth Taylor, star of his film “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf.”

By Adam Langer

Published November 20, 2014, issue of November 28, 2014.

Born Mikhail Peschkowsky in Berlin, Mike Nichols went on to become one of the greatest forces in American comedy and film. An early member of Chicago’s Compass Players, which went on to become Second City, one half of Nichols and May, director of “The Graduate,” “Catch 22,” and most recently “Charlie Wilson’s War,” Nichols has passed away at the age of 83. Here, we take a look back at 11 of the greatest moments in Nichols’s history.

1) “Plastics”
From “The Graduate,” directed by Nichols, written by Buck Henry, starring Dustin Hoffman.

2) “Telephone,” written and performed by Nichols and Elaine May

3) “What a Dump”
From “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf,” written by Edward Albee, starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton.

4) Bach to Bach:
From a rare short film written and performed by Nichols and Elaine May

5) “How About Those Dolphins?”
From “The Birdcage,” written by Elaine May, directed by Nichols.

6) “You Broke My Heart—Explain That.”
From “Angels in America,” written by Tony Kushner, starring Al Pacino, directed by Nichols.



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